Young deaf people to work in Tanzania

By: Johnny Baltzersen 

Recently, CISU approved the reporting on our latest project with the deaf organization in Tanzania CHAVITA. The project focused on strengthening deaf people’s access to sign language in communication with public authorities, employers and in social life in general. CISU writes, among other things:

“It is positive how the project has contributed to building CHAVITA’s capacity for campaigning and advocacy, as well as strengthening cooperation and relations with responsible and relevant stakeholders.
It’s impressive how the project has developed and disseminated an online sign language dictionary. CISU recognizes the value of this dictionary to public services and authorities. It will be interesting to see what effect the dictionary has on communication in the longer term.
Finally, it is positive that you plan to continue the collaboration between CICED and CHAVITA, as there seems to be a need for continued focus on the challenges related to the respect of the rights of the deaf in Tanzania”.

Finally, it is positive that you plan to continue the collaboration between CICED and CHAVITA, as there seems to be a need for continued focus on the challenges related to the respect of the rights of the deaf in Tanzania”.

Although appropriate legislation has existed for many years to support the integration of people with disabilities into the world of work, awareness of this legislation is very limited in the public and private sectors. Furthermore, public and private employers have little or no access to guidance on creating working conditions that adequately meet the special needs of deaf people, for example. Studies show that only around 3% of people with disabilities are on a fixed income.

The new project will focus on educating public and private employers about the rights of deaf people and will provide guidance on how to design workplaces to integrate deaf people into the workplace. At the same time, efforts are being made to make vocational courses suitable for young deaf people.

In three districts, CHAVITA will – as a pilot program – directly support at least 38 young women and 22 young men in their job search. Local employers will be visited by the young people along with a sign language interpreter and CHAVITA campaigners. We look forward to sharing more about the initiative when it launches later this spring.

Campaign for sign language as the language of the deaf – International Week of the Deaf 2022

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